Browse Teaching
Explore commonly taught topics along with related primary sources, discussion questions, teaching strategies, and annotated bibliographies.

Short Teaching Module: Cleopatra, Gender, Beauty and Power in Egypt and Rome

Our most important early sources on Cleopatra are Roman histories, which are problematic in their reliability. Cleopatra held the status as the “enemy” for Romans, which created a bias among Roman authors. Moreover, Rome’s patriarchal culture influenced writers’ views of a powerful female ruler.

... Read More »

Source Collection: Diversity and Change in Greco-Roman Religious Beliefs

This module will examine four different indigenous theologies within the Greco-Roman world to understand the diversity and change that occurred within Greco-Roman religion over the centuries.

... Read More »
Document icon

Long Teaching Module: Trade and Religion in the Indian Ocean Network, 1100-1500

Global trade is a central aspect of the contemporary world, but trade was also important in pre-modern eras. The most important trading network in the period from the tenth through the fifteenth centuries was that across Eurasia, both land routes and sea routes, especially those across and around the Indian Ocean.

... Read More »
A stone monument with a cross on top.

Short Teaching Module: Christianity and Slavery in the Kingdom of Kongo, 1480s-1520s

Portuguese missionaries brought Christianity to West Africa in the late fifteenth century. They had their greatest success at conversion in the Kingdom of the Kongo, a powerful state that was never conquered in the early modern period. Here rulers created a Kongolese version of Christianity, combining local beliefs and practices with imported ones.

... Read More »
Thumbnail image of Glikl

Syllabus: Women and Gender in World History, 600-2000

The syllabus below lays out a 15-week course, beginning in the 6th century and continuing through the 20th century. It provides suggestions for how to use units and their various parts with your students, as some of the materials are student-facing, and others are instructor-facing.

... Read More »

Long Teaching Module: Women and Empire

This teaching cluster assembles an array of primary and secondary sources, as well as teaching strategies and lesson plans, for educators to effectively teach the important roles women played in colonial and imperial projects from the 17th century to the 20th century.

... Read More »

Long Teaching Module: The Collapse of Yugoslavia

This case study examines the rewriting and reworking of Serbian national history that accompanied the breakup of Communist Yugoslavia, especially by intellectuals, and the role such groups played in reconstructing and resurrecting a distinct narrative of Serbia’s national history.

This long teaching module includes an activity and two primary sources.

... Read More »

Source Collection: Songs of the Revolution

Music and singing were fundamentally important parts of the revolutionary experience. Amateurs and formally trained composers alike produced thousands of songs and hymns that celebrated or criticized the Revolution. Men and women sang during revolutionary festivals, in bars, cafés, and theaters, and they fought with others who dared to sing royalist or reactionary songs.

... Read More »
Code of Hammurabi

Short Teaching Module: Hammurabi's Code

An extremely useful source for discussions of Mesopotamian government and society is the Babylonian document Hammurabi’s Code (circa 1780 BCE). One of the most influential codifications of law in ancient history, the text provides students with a concrete example of the expanding influence of centralized government on the personal and professional lives of the general population.

... Read More »
Document icon

Short Teaching Module: Women's Travel Writing

Women’s travel writing is a rich source for teaching world history. In this module, Patricia M.E. Lorcin explains how she uses two examples of women's travel writing to help students better understand a wide range of issues in world history.

... Read More »

Pages