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Prison Plan of Perm-36

Prison Plan of Perm-36

Plan of Perm-36 made by Lett Gunar Astra (in Latvian).

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ITK-6 Camp (Perm-36)

ITK-6 Camp (Perm-36)

ITK-6 Camp (Perm-36) in 1946. The camp had four barracks for 250 prisoners each, a punishment block (for prisoners who disobeyed the harsh camp rules), a hospital, outhouses, and a headquarters building.

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Saw Used By Timber Camp Prisoners

Saw Used By Timber Camp Prisoners

A typical frame-saw used by the timber camp prisoners. The prisoners cut down trees throughout the year and sent the lumber down river during the spring thaw to help rebuild Soviet cities damaged in the war.

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Siberian Hinterland

Siberian Hinterland

To the east of the Perm region lies the vast Siberian hinterland.

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Perm Region Camps, 1948-1953

Perm Region Camps, 1948-1953

The Soviets established Perm 36, called ITK-6 camp, in 1946 as a logging camp in the forested region of the Ural Mountains near the Siberian border. Here, prisoners cut down trees throughout the year and sent the lumber down river during the spring thaw to help rebuild Soviet cities damaged in the war. This camp was typical of thousands throughout the country.

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Trial of "Rich Peasants"

Trial of "Rich Peasants"

Trial of so-called “rich peasants” in 1929. Stalin’s drive to seize all private land in the 1920s and 1930s met significant resistance. Some victims were shot, some were arrested and sent into the Gulag camps, and many were exiled to remote parts of the country.

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Arrest of "Rich Peasant"

Arrest of "Rich Peasant"

Arrest of a so-called “rich peasant” in 1930. This peasant, Mikhailov, had attempted escape from a state-owned farm where he had been sent into exile.

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Ivan Burylov

Ivan Burylov and Voting Ballot

Seeking the appearance of democracy, the Soviet Union held elections, but only one Communist Party candidate appeared on the ballot for each office. Fear of punishment ensured that nearly all Soviet citizens “voted” by taking their ballot and ceremoniously placing it into a ballot box.

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Maria Tchebotareva

Maria Tchebotareva

Trying to feed her four hungry children during the massive 1932-1933 famine, the peasant mother allegedly stole three pounds of rye from her former field—confiscated by the state as part of collectivization. Soviet authorities sentenced her to ten years in the Gulag. When her sentence expired in 1943, it was arbitrarily extended until the end of the war in 1945.

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