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North/Central America

Puerto Rican Needleworkers in a Factory, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1942
Teaching

Short Teaching Module: Portraying Women Workers: Beyond Norma Rae

Starting at the turn of the twentieth century, U.S. and insular government offices and textile and garment businesses incorporated women of the New South and Puerto Rico into manufacturing in distinct yet interrelated ways.

Sally Fields in the film Norma Rae (1979)
Source

Norma Rae: Depicting Women's Labor History through Film

In this still shot from the movie Norma Rae, two pretty and petite white actors represent southern mill hands. Norma, portrayed by the famous actress Sally Field, stands with her mother (Barbara Baxley).

Puerto Rican Needleworkers in a Factory, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1942
Source

Puerto Rican Needleworkers in a Factory, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1942

This government photograph provides an important contrast to the popular culture images of poor southern whites. During the 1940s and 1950s, U.S. government agencies hired photographers to travel the main island of Puerto Rico to capture the conditions of working people.

Brochure Cover for the South Carolina Inter-State and West Indian Exposition/Charleston, 1901-1902
Source

Brochure for the South Carolina Inter-State and West Indian Exposition / Charleston Exposition, 1901-1902

This is the cover for a pamphlet to promote the Charleston Exposition and recruit exhibitors and attendees from along the entire U.S. Atlantic, which ran from New England to Florida to Cuba and Puerto Rico.

Source

Least Cost Pathway Analysis Showing Movement Across a Landscape

These side by side charts show the basics of how least cost pathway analysis works in action. A geographic surface, landscape or seascape, is broken into standard size squares (or cells).

Remains of the Stargate Canoe
Source

Remains of the Stargate Canoe

This image showcases one of the few remains of a canoe found in the Caribbean. The ‘Stargate’ canoe, found in a blue hole—a large marine cavern--on the island of South San Andros in the Bahamas, represents only the tip of the canoe.

Newspaper headline: "O.A.C. graduates are eighty-two" transcription in folder in module.
Teaching

Short Teaching Module: Indian Immigrants and U.S. Citizenship in an Imperial Context

Scholars often study citizenship and denaturalization in national frameworks. The history of legal status and its attendant politics and bureaucratic processes in the United States has long been tied to imperial constellations however.

Article on Mohammed Abdul Rashid. Full text in module folder.
Source

Britain pressures U.S. to revoke citizenship of Indian activist

The US press often carried news of diplomatic issues in its headlines. This included references to matters of citizenship.

Headline: U.S. May Revoke Das' Citizenship. Full transcript in folder in module.
Source

U.S. targets Indian activist, Taraknath Das

During World War I, U.S. and British officials expanded a transimperial surveillance apparatus designed to police enemy aliens and foreign threats. U.S.

2 Prints of a Sole Amerindian in a Canoe
Source

2 Prints of a Sole Amerindian in a Canoe

These images of a man in a canoe come from the work of the Spanish official, historian, and botanist Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo (1478-1557), who created many images of Amerindians while he was in the Caribbean during the 1520s.