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The page of a diary with hand writing on it
Methods

Analyzing Personal Accounts

Personal accounts, including memoirs, journals, diaries, autobiographies, and life histories, are important historical sources that help us understand the human condition. These are the stories we tell about our lives that usually portray a larger picture of a life in historical context.

An image on the cover of Dreams of Trespass featuring three women in Moroccan dress walking away down a hall decorated with aniconic ornament.
Source

Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi

Written by Moroccan feminist and sociologist Fatima Mernissi, Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood is a semi-fictional tale about a young girl growing up in a traditional Moroccan harem in the 1940s and 1950s.

The page of a diary with hand writing on it
Source

Original Manuscripts of Anne Frank

Born to a Jewish family in 1929, Anne Frank is most known for the diary she kept while in hiding from Nazi forces during World War II. The War broke out in 1939 when Anne was ten-years-old.

Black and white photo of 10 girls and one teacher seated at tables with needles, fabric, and sewing machines.
Source

Sewing Classes at Mount Margaret Mission

These two photographs, from the State Library of Western Australia, show Aboriginal girls learning to sew from Dorothy Lovick at the Mount Margaret Mission in Laverton, Australia, in the 1930s. The first photograph shows a middle school class, while the second one features a senior class.

Cover with text South African Native Affairs Commission 1903-1905 Report
Source

South African Native Affairs Commission report on education

In 1903, Alfred Milner, the British High Commissioner for South Africa, appointed the South African Native Affairs Commission to examine “the status and condition of the Natives” and to provide recommendations “on questions concerning Native policy” (1-2).

Text of an article on girls school transcription below
Source

“Maori Girls School”

This article, which was published in the newspaper Manawatu Times on April 14, 1905, announces the opening of a school for Māori girls.

Video still showing Scouts paddling canoes
Source

Video: Boy Scouts at 1929 World Jamboree Perform as Native Americans

This video features film footage of events at the Boy Scouts’ third World Jamboree, held in England in 1929. The jamboree was known as the “Coming of Age” Jamboree, since it marked twenty-one years since the foundation of the Boy Scouts.

Video still showing a boy scout sitting and eating.
Source

Video: Indian Boy Scouts at 1929 World Jamboree

This video features film footage of events at the Boy Scouts’ third World Jamboree, held in England in 1929. The jamboree was known as the “Coming of Age” Jamboree, since it marked twenty-one years since the foundation of the Boy Scouts.

Black and white still of boy scouts marching past a reviewing stand.
Source

Video: March of Flags from 1929 Boy Scout World Jamboree

This video shows the opening ceremony at the Boy Scouts’ third World Jamboree, held in England in 1929. The jamboree was known as the “Coming of Age” Jamboree, since it marked twenty-one years since the foundation of the Boy Scouts.

Scouts in uniforms marching with flags and a sign reading "Union of S. Africa"
Source

Photograph of the Boy Scout World Jamboree in 1929

This photograph shows the South African contingent at the Boy Scouts’ third World Jamboree, held in England in 1929. The jamboree was known as the “Coming of Age” Jamboree, since it marked twenty-one years since the foundation of the Boy Scouts.