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Cover of protest pamphlet on behalf of "comfort women"

Piglas-Diwa newsletter/booklet

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The Piglas-Diwa newsletter/booklet is a creation of the feminist group of Filipino “comfort women" called Lila-Pilipina, who have banded together with feminist goals/messages for peace. "Comfort women" were women during World War II forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese military, although it took decades for this to be acknowledged, and to this day is not acknowledged in Japanese history... Read More »

Portón de Campo

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This stone structure, also known as the Puerta de la Ciudadela, belonged to the historic defensive walls of Colonia del Sacramento. Although the city is located in modern-day Uruguay, at the time of construction (1745), it was occupied by the Portuguese under Governor Vasconcellos. During the colonial period, both Spanish and Portuguese forces built these types of structures in their American... Read More »

Portrait of General Artigas

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José Gervasio Artigas Arnal (1764-1850) was a Uruguayan soldier who became a national hero for his contributions to the wars of independence from Spain. He is a celebrated figure in Uruguayan culture, and his name has become ubiquitous throughout the country. For example, one of the main roads in its capital city of Montevideo is Artigas Bulevard. Artist Juan Manuel Blanes painted this... Read More »

Portrait of Hernán Cortés

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Hernán Cortés, a central figure in the establishment of Spanish rule in the Americas, is the subject of this painting. Throughout his career, he led several voyages back and forth between Spain, the Carribean, and Mexico. The Spanish Crown awarded him titles of honor for his efforts, including “Capitán General de las tierras conquistadas” and “Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca.” In the top corner of... Read More »

Portrait of Manuel Mansilla

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This painting depicts Manuel Mansilla, the Alguacil Mayor (sheriff) of the city of Buenos Aires. He held this position from 1795-1821, during a key transitional moment. When he began his tenure, the city belonged to the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata, under Spanish rule. However, by 1821, the region was establishing its independence as the nation of Argentina. The position of Alguacil... Read More »

Pound Homestead

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This historic homestead was built in the mid-nineteenth century near modern-day Dripping Springs, Texas. It belonged to the family of Joseph M. Pound, a doctor who provided medical services to the local community, including the indigeous peoples (such as the Tonkawa). He had also served in the Confederate army. During this period, Texas was a sparsely-populated frontier region. The home itself... Read More »

Promised Horrors of the French Invasion

Promised Horrors of the French Invasion

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This highly sophisticated political cartoon by the noted engraver James Gillray from October 1796 responds to Edmund Burke’s pamphlet, "Reflections on a Regicide Peace." This image argues against further war with France to avoid bankrupting the British treasury and exposing England itself to invasion. This cartoon mocks that idea, attributing it to the supposedly "radical" tendencies of... Read More »

Provision for the Restatement of Names and Surnames

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Images of 1989 tend to center on dramatic events in Berlin, in Beijing, in Bucharest, and in Johannesburg, just to name a few. Visions of mass demonstration and popular uprising predominate. Even in places like the former Czechoslovakia, where peaceful transition occurred in a "velvet" revolution, the perception is one of overthrow of state authority in the name of popular reform. Lost in... Read More »

Inset of Puerto Rice from a map of the Spanish American War in 1898

Puerto Rico at the Dawn of the Modern Age

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This site commemorates the Spanish-American War of 1898 that ended Spanish colonial rule in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Philippines, and began U.S. control of these areas.

Reagan at the Berlin Wall

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On June 12, 1987, President Ronald Reagan gave an historic speech to the people of Berlin. It was here that Reagan spoke the famous phrase: "General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"

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