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Thumbnail image of a Korean painting from MIA's Art of Asia website

Art of Asia

Review
This site, an integrated, interactive media program, introduces users to the various arts of Asia. The site focuses on MIA’s extensive collections of Asian art, focusing on Chinese and Japanese art.
Haseki Hürrem Baths in Istanbul

Ayyubid and Ottoman Architecture

Source

In the Islamic world, women were able to own and control their own property at a time when Christian women in Europe were unable to do so. Many wealthy women endowed public buildings as a mark of their piety. In these examples, we see the way that Ayyubid and Ottoman women used the endowment of public architecture to engage directly in public life. Built in their names and with their money,... Read More »

Thumbnail image of Aztec Cradleboard Figurine and Drawing

Aztec Cradleboard Figurine and Drawing

Source

The ceramic figurine of an infant in a cradle (also called a cradleboard) was created by the Nahua, or Aztec people of Mexico, between 1350 and 1521 CE. It shows how infants were kept bound in a cradle or carried on a cradleboard, a practice that was common among the indigenous peoples of the Americas. The figurine also shows how the baby would have been bound or swaddled in the cradle. The... Read More »

Bamboo River II, Tale of Genji Painting Scroll

Source

The greatest work produced during the Heian era was The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu, lady-in-waiting to Empress Akiko. Considered the world’s first novel, Genji is written as an absorbing portrait of Heian court life, the splendor of its rituals, and aesthetic culture. The Tale of Genji has been, through the centuries, the subject of visual illustration and... Read More »

Barada Panel in Great Mosque in Damascus

Source

The panel shown here is five meters (16.7 feet) above ground level on the wall in the courtyard of the Great Mosque in Damascus. The original image is created in mosaic technique. Choosing to execute an image in mosaic involves setting thousands of small pieces of glass, ceramic, or stone into mortar. In antiquity (the technique was invented in the Mediterranean basin in about the 4th century... Read More »

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Bernard of Clairvaux's Apologia

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Bernard of Clairvaux was abbot of the Cistercian monastery of Clairvaux, in Burgundy, France, and a well-known preacher who travelled widely and was involved with many of the most pressing issues of his day, from papal power to the Crusades. The Cistercians were a reformed order who espoused ascetic ideals, and were deeply critical of other orders of monks whose lives were more integrated with... Read More »

Poster for a play called 'Battle Hymn', depicting the red outline of abolitionist John Brown and a blue flag

Beyond the Bubble

Review
Beyond the Bubble is a fantastic initiative that provides educators with an array of thoughtful and easily implementable history assessments.
thumbnail of the god siva

Bhakti Poets: Poem, Akkamahadevi

Source

Bhakti poets—who were in some cases lower-caste Hindu women—and their audiences drew emotional sustenance from these verses, which expressed a pure devotion to Hindu deities. Their poetry, written in local languages beginning in the 6th century in South India and the 12th century in North India, attracted large audiences among the marginalized in Hindu society, such as women and “untouchables... Read More »

thumbnail of the god siva

Bhakti Poets: Poem, Akkamahadevi 2

Source

Bhakti poets—who were in some cases lower-caste Hindu women—and their audiences drew emotional sustenance from these verses, which expressed a pure devotion to Hindu deities. Their poetry, written in local languages beginning in the 6th century in South India and the 12th century in North India, attracted large audiences among the marginalized in Hindu society, such as women and “untouchables... Read More »

thumbnail of a veena

Bhakti Poets: Poem, Janabai

Source

Bhakti poets—who were in some cases lower-caste Hindu women—and their audiences drew emotional sustenance from these verses, which expressed a pure devotion to Hindu deities. Their poetry, written in local languages beginning in the 6th century in South India and the 12th century in North India, attracted large audiences among the marginalized in Hindu society, such as women and “untouchables... Read More »

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