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Brothers Grimm cover

"How Some Children Played at Slaughtering"

Source

The pioneering collection of fairy tales published by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm in the first half of the 19th century reflects both the romantic interest in the national past—that is, in the cultural origins and "childhood" of the German people—and the burgeoning efforts to create a literature tailored to the perceived needs of children. "How Some Children Played at Slaughtering" encompasses two... Read More »

"The Royal Orgy" (1789)

Source

In 1789, with the collapse of old regime censorship as well as a sense of liberation from traditional moral constraints, printed libels against the Queen became both more common and more intense. An example of this greater intensity is this light opera, with raunchy lyrics set to popular tunes. Not intended to be performed, the pamphlet spoofs the Queen’s great interest in opera and her... Read More »

Title page of Camila O'Gorman

"To the Spirits of Camila O'Gorman"

Source

The story of Camila O'Gorman (1828-1848), the daughter of a prominent merchant in the Buenos Aires community, is one of the most famous cases of a young person challenging both parental and state authority. In 1847, at the height of Rosas's power, 19-year-old Camila and Ladislao Gutiérrez, a young Catholic priest from Tucumán, fell in love. On December 12, 1847, they eloped and fled to... Read More »

Example page from The New England Primer

19th Century Schoolbooks

Review
This site will be most immediately useful to those studying the history of U.S. education, but other historians can find much here that could be of use in their classes
Thumbnail of a older photograph depicting a girl sucking her thumb

19th-century American Children and What They Read

Review
19th-century American Children and What They Read is a website born of a passion for exactly that—material written for children, and occasionally by children, in the 19th century.
Close-up of the bull seal from the Indus Valley Civilization

A History of the World in 100 Objects

Review
Overall A History of the World in 100 Objects is a great resource to teach world history through visual culture in an accessible and succinct format for both school and college-level classes.
A Poem by Victor Hugo (1830)

A Poem by Victor Hugo (1830)

Source

In his poem “To the Column,” the great French poet Victor Hugo celebrates the memory of Napoleon.

This source is a part of the The Napoleonic Experience teaching module.

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Source

The English writer Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–97) argued against both Burke and Rousseau, defending the notion of natural rights, particularly rights for women, such as equal education. She insisted that women could not become virtuous, even as mothers, unless they won the right to participate in economic and political life on an equal basis with men. Although she did not specifically demand... Read More »

Photo of a woman with writing in the background

African American Women Writers of the 19th Century

Review
Students might examine how the inclusion of African American women's perspectives alters more standardized narratives of American history.

Albert Schatz Collection

Review
Not only do these sources span a range of time periods, but they also span a geographical area.

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