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Divorce in the Soviet Union

Source

One of Mikhail Gorbachev's most famous reform movements was 'glasnost' (openness), which allowed partial freedom of the press to address social problems and corruption within the Soviet Union. Among the issues raised during the 'glasnost' era were previously forbidden subjects such as the high rate of divorce. An example of this is the following poster, with its plaintive cry from the child in... Read More »

Divorce in the Soviet Union

Source

One of Mikhail Gorbachev's most famous reform movements was 'glasnost' (openness), which allowed partial freedom of the press to address social problems and corruption within the Soviet Union. Among the issues raised during the 'glasnost' era of the Soviet Union were social problems, including previously forbidden subjects such as the high rate of divorce. An example of this is the following... Read More »

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Early Modern Period: Autobiography, Glückel of Hameln

Source

The following passages offer us a glimpse into the margins of early modern European society. Glückel of Hameln (1645-1724) was born into the Jewish community of Hamburg, a thriving German commercial center. When Glückel was four, the city expulsed its Jewish residents, forcing her family’s exile. Ten years later, Glückel married Hayim of Hameln, with whom she had twelve children. During her... Read More »

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Early Modern Period: Nonfiction, Confucian Doctrine

Source

This excerpt comes from Onna daigaku, or Greater Learning for Women, which is commonly attributed to Kaibara Ekiken (1630-1714), a Japanese botanist and Neo-Confucian philosopher. Ekiken was most concerned with translating Confucian doctrine into terms people from all classes could understand. His Onna daigaku is considered by many to be the most important ethical text for Japanese women, in... Read More »

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Early Modern Period: Petition, Ming China

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This letter is an official petition to the Ming Emperor of China, Shi Zong (r. 1522-67). Written around 1566, it is attributed to Lady Chang, only wife of Shên Shu, a high bureaucrat in the Chinese court. However, it was likely coauthored by his favorite concubine, whose name is unknown. A Censor for the Ministry of Rites, Shên Shu was accused by a powerful rival of misleading the Emperor with... Read More »

Eid Holiday Amusements

Source

On the two major celebrations of the Islamic lunar calendar—Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha—public festivities in cities and towns across Muslim regions of Asia, Africa, and elsewhere include rides of various kinds. In the photograph at top from Jenin, in the West Bank city of Palestine, children and young adults ride a whirling disk brought in for the occasion. In the lower photograph, Afghani... Read More »

Eighteenth-Century Uruguayan Home

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On display here are several objects from the Museo Casa de Nacarello, a small museum in Colonia, Uruguay that aims to recreate daily life in an eighteenth-century home. The building that houses the museum dates from that period, and it contains furniture, dishes, and decorations that residents of Colonia would have used at the time. In the corner of this room, a washing basin sits on a small... Read More »

Mosaic of sumerian craftsmen working

Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature

Review
the collection is arguably made more valuable and useful by its focus on a limited cultural and historical context and by its presentation of texts that are less well known and more difficult to locate.
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Emory Women Writers Resource Project

Review
The subjects covered are diverse and include commentaries on such topics as nature, native-white relations, emancipation, imperialism, social and sexual mores, wet nursing, Christianity, and women’s suffrage.
Emperor Jahangir Weighing His Son Khurram in Gold image thumbnail

Emperor Jahangir Weighing His Son Khurram in Gold

Source

The finely detailed miniature painting in an album created for the Emperor Jahangir (reigned 1605–1627) of the Mughal Empire in India shows a ceremony initiated by Jahangir's father, Akbar the Great (reigned 1556-1605), Jahangir's father. Twice each year on the first day of the solar and lunar years, at an hour calculated by the court astrologers, the emperor himself or one of his sons would... Read More »

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