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On the Murder of Eratosthenes

Source

In this speech, an Athenian man, Euphiletos, defends himself against a murder accusation, claiming that his killing of his wife’s lover was justifiable homicide. The case reveals much about gender in Athens including details about family structure, the presence of “women’s quarters” in the Athenian household, and attitudes toward women with regard to questions of chastity, loyalty, and... Read More »

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Ona Family Group of Tierra del Fuego

Source

Father Alberto Maria De Agostini, a missionary, took this postcard image on Isla Grande, Tierra del Fuego, on the southernmost tip of South America. The photograph, taken circa 1930, shows a man, woman, and two children walking through a clearing surrounded by thickets. The man and boy are carrying bows and arrows, and the younger child walks close to his or her mother, who is carrying bundles... Read More »

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Online Museum Educational Resources in Asian Art

Review
The OMuERAA connects with more than one hundred museums, making a rich array of educational materials available to students and instructors 
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Operation Babylift

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These photographs were taken on April 5, 1975 on one of the Pan Am passenger planes that airlifted Vietnamese orphans and Amerasian children of American servicemen and Vietnamese women for Operation Babylift. In the final weeks before the fall of Saigon in April 1975, President Gerald Ford authorized the operation as a gesture to repatriate children who would be American citizens if recognized... Read More »

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Orphan Records, Early Modern France

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Much of early modern Europe saw increasing numbers of abandoned children, and new institutions designed to care for them. Published notarial documents, such as the two excerpted here, allow a glimpse into the fortunes of individual orphaned children in early modern Europe.

These documents are excerpted from Ages of Woman, Ages of Man: Sources in European Social History, 1400-1750 edited... Read More »

Parque Lage

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The Parque Lage is located in the heart of Rio de Janeiro, and at the foot of the Christ the Redeemer mountain. The site features lush gardens and a nineteenth-century mansion. Its name originates from the former residents of the home, Henrique Lage and Gabriella Besanzoni. Lage earned his extensive wealth from his investment in industrialization across several industries, including port... Read More »

Pedro de Cieza de Léon: Chronicles of the Incas, 1540

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This text is an excerpt from Spanish conquistador Pedro de Cieza de Léon's writings on the Inca and Peru. He served as a solider during campaigns in present-day Colombia and Peru. He participated in the reconquest of Peru from Spanish rebel forces. After the reconquest, he interviewed local officials and Inca lords about Inca history and culture. Cieza de Léon used these interviews, along with... Read More »

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People with a History: An Online Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans* History

Review
In essence then this is an excellent site to find additional materials with some caveats: some links are now dead, in other ways this site is dated, and other parts – such as the section on images – are still empty. Still the materials that this site provides educators with great resources and thought-provoking articles.
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Peter Kolb Travel Narrative 2

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Peter Kolb was a German astronomer and mathematician who lived at the Cape from 1705 to 1713. He was initially sponsored by a German baron to make astronomical observations in pursuit of a way to calculate longitude accurately. When this project ended, Kolb stayed at the Cape and observed everything else. Kolb was writing for a European audience, and therefore often played to their... Read More »

Pieter Cnoll, Batavian Senior Merchant

Source

Painted by Jacob Coeman in 1665, this painting depicts Pieter Cnoll, his Eurasian wife Cornelia van Nijenrode, their two daughters, and two enslaved servants. Cnoll was a senior merchant of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia (present-day Jakarta), which was the center of Dutch operations in Asia. His wife, Cornelia, was the daughter of a VOC merchant and a Japanese courtesan.... Read More »

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