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The Alarm of the People

Source

Composed by J.M. Souriguieres, a parisian dramatist, and Pierre Gaveaux, an actor, this song demands revenge for the crimes and bloodshed of the Terror. It was quickly adopted as an anthem by the "gilded youth" of the Thermidoran Reaction, who sang it in opposition to singers of the Marseillaise.

This source is a part of the... Read More »

Title page of The Ancient History of the Maori

The Ancient History of the Maori

Source

In this excerpt, an adult Horeta Te Taniwha recounts childhood memories of a cultural encounter with Europeans for a Pakeha researcher. Te Taniwha, as an indigenous child of Aotearoa/New Zealand, participated in one of the first meetings between coastal tribes and the British maritime explorer, Captain James Cook, and his crew. These interactions were written up contemporaneously in Cook's... Read More »

The Annoyance of Walking etching

The Annoyance of Walking

Source

French nobles had been used to riding in carriages or on horseback. Now, so radicals hoped, they could no longer afford to do so either financially or politically. The imagined response of this social elite reveals clearly to their attackers the worthlessness of such people.

The Archbishop's Palace of Alcalá de Henares

Source

The town of Alcalá de Henares is located outside of Madrid, the current capital of Spain. In the late-fifteenth century, it served an important purpose as the home of the archbishop. His lavish palace was lavishly decorated, but considerably smaller than other royal homes. Yet, it still occasionally hosted other dignitaries, such as Queen Isabella (1451-1504). It was during the 1490s, during... Read More »

The Assassination of Marat by Charlotte Corday

The Assassination of Marat by Charlotte Corday

Source

In the fall of 1793, the radical journalist was confined to his bathtub by a paralyzing skin disease he had contracted while hiding from the police in the sewers. He nevertheless continued to pour out populist tracts and remained highly influential in the sections. Whether out of personal obsession or prompting, Charlotte Corday sneaked into his home to silence this self–declared tribune of... Read More »

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THE ASSEMBLY COMPLAINS TO THE KING ABOUT THE ÉMIGRÉS

Source

Having received news of the alliance of Prussia and Austria with émigré French nobles against the Revolution, the Legislative Assembly considered itself threatened by invasion. Fearing that the King, despite his public acceptance of the constitution, had allied himself with this coalition, the assembly addressed Louis XVI and asked him to declare his opposition to the émigrés and if necessary... Read More »

Thumbnail of a painting of three women and a girl watching a patient being carried.

The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas: A Visual Record

Review
The images document the history of enslavement in West and West Central Africa, the English and French Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States.

The Attack on the Tuileries (10 August 1792)

Source

In early August, the Legislative Assembly was deadlocked, unable to decide what to do about the King, the constitution, the ongoing war, and above all the political uprisings in Paris. On 4 August, the most radical Parisian section, "the section of the 300," issued an "ultimatum" to the Legislative Assembly, threatening an uprising if no action was taken by midnight 9 August. On the appointed... Read More »

The Barnyard

The Barnyard

Source

As shown in this print, numerous activities of plantation life were carried out by enslaved people. This scene includes women and children, who formed a relatively small part of the enslaved population.

The Bill of Rights, 1689

Source

In response to policies that threatened to restore Catholicism in England, Parliament deposed King James II and called William of Orange from the Dutch Republic and his wife Mary, who was James’s Protestant daughter, to replace him. William and Mary agreed to the Bill of Rights presented to them by Parliament, thereby acknowledging that their power came from the legislature rather than from... Read More »

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