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Akbar II in darbar with the British Resident Charles Metcalfe

Source

Attributed to the Mughal court artist, Ghulam Murtaza Khan (active 1809–30), this painting depicts British Resident Charles Metcalfe (1785-1846) in attendance at the court of Akbar II, who ruled Mughal India from 1806-37. Depicted in a monochromatic outfit with a European-style hat, Metcalfe's figure stands in sharp contrast with the colorful outfits of the court's other courtiers. Despite the... Read More »

Thumbnail of school building photo

Kaichi and Mitsuke Schools

Source

While most pre-Meiji commoner schools were held either in temples or in the homes of the teachers, most teachers and officials associated with the Meiji education reforms emphasized the importance of having schools in new buildings created specifically for the purpose of education. While this goal took around three decades to accomplish, there were some early, ambitious efforts to erect school... Read More »

Deposition of Jan Joosten

"Torture by Water" in the Early Modern Dutch Empire

Source

The Amboyna trial was a famous conspiracy case that took place in 1623 when a group of Japanese mercenaries were accused of plotting with English merchants to seize control of a Dutch fort on a remote island in Southeast Asia. Despite occurring thousands of miles away in an unfamiliar part of the world, the trial on Amboyna swiftly escalated to become one of the most famous legal cases of the... Read More »

Painting of a man on horseback.

A Hindu Princess Committing Sati against the Wishes of Emperor Akbar

Source

This 18th century painting by Mohammad Rizā Naw'ī depicts Sati, the practice whereby an elite Hindu widow would commit suicide through self-immolation upon the death of her husband. Sati was featured prominently in European depictions of Hinduism where it reinforced “exotic” stereotypes of South Asians, and was used as an excuse to justify British Imperialism. In reality, the practice was not... Read More »

Close-up of the bull seal from the Indus Valley Civilization

A History of the World in 100 Objects

Review
Overall A History of the World in 100 Objects is a great resource to teach world history through visual culture in an accessible and succinct format for both school and college-level classes.
Image of Francois-Rene Moreau on a horse

Age of Revolutions

Review
Two features are particularly valuable for students and teachers: the thematic bibliography section and the ‘Teaching Revolutions’ section.
Image of a stamped letter with Japanese writing

Ainu and Ezochi Rare Collection

Review
In this case, the collection focuses on the expansion of the ethnically Japanese “Wajin” people into the northern islands of present day Japan.
thumbnail of the book excerpt

An Encouragement of Learning

Source

Fukuzawa Yukichi (1835-1901) is one of the most famous figures of modern Japan. He was an intellectual, journalist, and educator who was the most visible advocate of modernization and Western Learning in the 1870s and 1880s. In this excerpt from his 1872 An Encouragement of Learning, Fukuzawa rejects traditional social hierarchies and the classical mode of education practiced by those at the... Read More »

A woman kneels and holds a piece of stone at an archeological site

Analyzing Material Objects

Methods

The modules in Methods present case studies that demonstrate how scholars interpret different kinds of historical evidence in world history. This module developed by historian Daniel Waugh explores how historians interpret material objects to better understand the past. Examples of objects include Turkish water jugs and Byzantine coins among others. Waugh introduces the kinds of questions... Read More »

The Drunkard thumbnail

Analyzing Paintings and Prints

Methods

The modules in Methods present case studies that demonstrate how scholars interpret different kinds of historical evidence in world history. In the video below, historian Brian Platt analyzes two ukiyo-e woodblock prints from the Tokugawa or Edo period in Japan (1600 to 1867) created by the artist Utamaro in 1802. These prints, titled, "The Drunkard" and "Vulgarly called the Wanton"... Read More »

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