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The use of the !gõïn!gõïn page

San Dance Ethnography

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Lucy Lloyd and Wilhelm Bleek, German ethnographers who lived in Cape Town, were the first people to systematically write down Khoisan folklore, beliefs, and customs. They did their work in the late 19th century, so there is no way to be sure that the traditional way of life described by the informants was the same as that lived by the Khoisan in the previous centuries. Nevertheless, we know... Read More »

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Scouting – Helping to Prepare Leaders of Tomorrow

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Jeremiah (J.J.M.) Nyagah was one of the most senior African members of the Kenya Boy Scout Association during the colonial era. Trained as a teacher, after independence he entered politics and became a cabinet minister in Jomo Kenyatta's government. He was therefore a logical choice to assume the largely ceremonial role of Chief Scout Commissioner. As the leader of Kenyan scouting, he had the... Read More »

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Slave Coffle, Central Africa, 1861

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This image shows children and adults making their way from the African interior to the coast in a slave coffle. While some may think that children were given special treatment because of their age, and some may have, this image suggests that this was not always the case. Teachers should caution students that this is also an image commissioned by abolitionists, who often used children to make a... Read More »

Image of a slave trading vessel

Slave Voyages

Review
Slave Voyages is an essential project for those seeking to learn more about enslavement and imperial powers in the Atlantic World, the transatlantic slave trade and Middle Passage, and the African diaspora.
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Street Children Billboard, Uganda

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The billboard shown in the two photographs carries a slogan used widely by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to promote public interest in the plight of abandoned, orphaned and runaway children living on the streets in cities of Africa, Asia, the Americas and elsewhere. The photograph of Ugandan children standing in front of the billboard wall shows two additional messages, "Street... Read More »

Image from the collection titled "Lady in Waiting" from the 1930s-1940s.  Its shows two children and their nanny walking.  The youngest child is walking in front with a cloth on her head and the nanny carrying the end like a wedding veil.

Swaziland Digital Archives

Review
Featuring approximately 600 photographs chronicling daily life and politics in Swaziland, the Swaziland Digital Archives provides visual insights into the experiences of childhood and adolescence in southern Africa over the past century.
Thumbnail of a painting of three women and a girl watching a patient being carried.

The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas: A Visual Record

Review
The images document the history of enslavement in West and West Central Africa, the English and French Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States.
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The Dolben's Act of 1788

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The Dolben's Act of 1788 was proposed by noted abolitionist Sir William Dolben before the English Parliament. While it was meant to restrict the slave trade, it actually had an adverse effect on children. The act mandated that no more than two fifths of a ship's cargo be children, and it also limited the number of African men to 1 male per ship ton. With such restrictions threatening slave... Read More »

Title page for The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano: Kidnapping

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From the 16th to the 18th centuries, an estimated 20 million Africans crossed the Atlantic to the Americas in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Until recently, slave studies rarely discussed children's experiences, but it has been estimated that one quarter of the slaves who crossed the Atlantic were children. Olaudah Equiano, kidnapped at age 11, became one of the most prominent English... Read More »

Title page of The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano: Middle Passage

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From the 16th to the 18th centuries, an estimated 20 million Africans crossed the Atlantic to the Americas in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Until recently, slave studies rarely discussed children's experiences, but it has been estimated that one quarter of the slaves who crossed the Atlantic were children. Olaudah Equiano, kidnapped at age 11, became one of the most prominent English... Read More »

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