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Modern Racism

Teaching

This assignment was for a world history course I teach to sophomores and is part of the larger post-World War II unit in the course. It comes after I teach the decolonization of Africa and Asia and is part of a small unit on modern global issues. I wanted students to take a look at the roots of “modern” racism and to make the connection between the status of blacks in the United States and... Read More »

Moonbeam Youth Training Center, Kenya

Source

The video shows The Moonbeam Youth Training Centre in Mavoko, Nairobi. The Centre is a project of UN-HABITAT built with support from UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon and UN-HABITAT Executive Director Mrs. Anna Tibaijuk. The purpose of the center is to improve housing in urban slums by training young people in low cost, alternative construction technologies. Trainees gain employable skills,... Read More »

Thumbnail image of Mud Crocodile Toy

Mud Crocodile Toy

Source

This small sculpture of a crocodile is made of Nile River mud, and was probably a toy fashioned by a child at play. The crocodile was a familiar monster to children living along the Nile—an object of fear and fascination. This 5 centimeter (2 inch) long mud figurine has open jaws, slits for eyes, a curved tail that seems to whip it through the water, and feet that seem to be in motion. The... Read More »

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Nana Asma'u, Muslim Woman Scholar

Teaching

One Woman’s Jihad: Nana Asma’u, Scholar and Scribe, loosely called a biography, is a case study from 19th-century northern Nigeria. Each chapter is organized around a selection from Asma’u’s writings, presented in full in the appendix. One Woman’s Jihad was written for this course as a way of talking about primary documents by a woman scholar. (1)

Screenshot of Smithsonian National Museum of African Art homepage

National Museum of African Art

Review
This site showcases an incredible collection of artwork from across the African continent, including more than 1,500 ancient artifacts, pieces collected in the colonial era, photographs, textiles, and works by modern African artists.

Organization of British Imperial Scouting

Source

This chart shows the official lines of authority in the imperial Boy Scout movement. In theory, the Imperial Scout Headquarters had direct control over local versions of scouting through its territorial associations. Scouting was like a secular religion, with Baden Powell as its prophet-like founder whose writings were the core of the scout canon and whose personal example was the guide for... Read More »

Pathfinder Warrant

Source

Imperial scout headquarters and the national and territorial scout associations were deeply concerned with ensuring that only respectable and responsible men became scoutmasters. In colonial Africa, this meant that potential scoutmasters had to also respect the political realities of European minority rule. As in Great Britain, acceptable candidates received a "warrant" from the territorial... Read More »

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Peter Kolb Travel Narrative 1

Source

Peter Kolb was a German astronomer and mathematician who lived at the Cape from 1705 to 1713. He was initially sponsored by a German baron to make astronomical observations in pursuit of a way to calculate longitude accurately. When this project ended, Kolb stayed at the Cape and observed everything else. About three years after his return to Germany, he began to compile a book about his... Read More »

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Peter Kolb Travel Narrative 2

Source

Peter Kolb was a German astronomer and mathematician who lived at the Cape from 1705 to 1713. He was initially sponsored by a German baron to make astronomical observations in pursuit of a way to calculate longitude accurately. When this project ended, Kolb stayed at the Cape and observed everything else. Kolb was writing for a European audience, and therefore often played to their... Read More »

Phoenician Baby Bottle thumbnail image

Phoenician Baby Bottle

Source

The Phoenician terracotta vessel features a human face, the nose forming a narrow spout. The bottle is an archaeological find from Carthage, near modern Tunis, dated to 399 BCE-200 BCE. Archaeologists believe this object was a baby bottle. It could have been used to feed diluted wine with honey or other sweet liquid such as juice, milk, or thin porridge, cooked cereal made from ground grain.... Read More »

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