Browse
Tag:
Horse drawn carts going down a cleared forest path taken from the view of a railway

Around the World in the 1890s: Photographs from the World's Transportation Commission, 1894-1896

Review
Although these photographs are immediately useful to any discussion of 19th-century travel, they also provide an important look at the nature of colonialism and industrialization in many of the regions to which Jackson traveled.
BaAka Women Dancing the Hunting Dance thumbnail image

BaAka Women Dancing the Hunting Dance, Ndambo

Source

This is an image of female BaAka dancers from the southwestern Central African Republic in the rainforest region dancing a hunting dance called Ndambo. Music and dance are important in BaAka culture. They can be performed for many reasons—sometimes in preparation for a hunt, other times to display skill. Dance and music bring together neighboring groups, helping people build social ties while... Read More »

Battle of Aboukir

Battle of Aboukir

Source

Napoleon’s eventual acquisition of political power may be attributed partly to his success in publicizing his Egyptian campaign as a great victory for France that spread the values of the Revolution. These engravings by the writer and artist Vivant Denon were published in 1802, four years after the campaign when Napoleon was already in power. This first image depicts The Battle of the Pyramids... Read More »

Beautiful Fatima

Source

Photography was critical to imperialism. The French army (and the British army in India) employed the camera’s lens to chronicle military exploits, first in Algeria during the 1850s, and later in Tunisia and Morocco. With advances in photographic technology, portrait studios were established in Europe and in European empires. Most studio photography in this period produced family portraits... Read More »

thumbnail of the text

British Empire: Fiction, Nervous Conditions

Source

In 1959, Tsitsi Dangarembga was born in Africa in the British colony known as Rhodesia, now called Zimbabwe. From the age of two, she spent four years living in Britain. On her return to Rhodesia, she attended a missionary school in Mutare. In 1977, she went back to Britain to attend Cambridge University, but became disillusioned with life and politics in Britain, returning home without... Read More »

thumbnail of the text

British Empire: Travel Narrative, Mary Kingsley

Source

Mary Kingsley (1862-1900) is one of the best known British women to have visited West Africa during the period historians call the Age of New Imperialism. Her early life gave no indication of her future renown. She spent the early part of her life confined to her home taking care of an invalid father. In possession of a small income following the death of her parents, she made two trips to... Read More »

Thumbnail of drawing of Africans liberated from slaving vessel

Captured Africans Liberated from a Slaving Vessel

Source

The Graphic, a London periodical owned by liberal reformer William Luson Thomas, was not an abolitionist publication per se, but it did seek to inspire action against those causes that Thomas felt demanded immediate attention, such as poverty, crime, and slavery. What we see in this image is the cargo of the liberated slave ship Dhow, a vessel captured by the authorities after the slave trade... Read More »

Table of information in German

Census of 1910 tuberculosis data

Source

Census data is one way for historians to better understand the lives of average people who otherwise might be largely invisible to scholars. This excerpt from the 1910 census conducted by the Hapsburg Monarchy. The census data was collected for most towns and cities throughout the Monarchy every few years from between 1880 and 1910. It covers occupation, disease, language, and literacy for men... Read More »

Thumbnail of fanoos making father and son

Child in Ramdan Lantern Family Workshop

Source

In the weeks and months before the start of Ramadan, the ninth lunar month when Muslims fast, traditional workshops like the one on Ahmad Maher Street in the medieval quarter of Cairo, turn recycled tin cans into glittering lanterns. In this "Street of the Lanterns," skills in cutting, hammering, perforating and framing colored glass that have been passed down through artisan families (who... Read More »

Thumbnail of girl holding plastic baby doll

Child with Purple Plastic Doll near Kumasi, Ghana

Source

The girl in the photograph is from the Asante peoples in Ghana. She is holding a purple plastic baby doll of a type that is frequently found in markets in Ghana. The doll is both imported from Taiwan and made domestically in Ghana. The modern plastic doll is based on an older, traditional form of wooden figurine manufactured by village blacksmiths to represent the adult, female figure. Girls... Read More »

Pages